RIP Mike…

This is the way the Navy takes care of its own. AWCS Mike Muehlbauer was the lead AW on the SH-60F test program. When he passed away, he was buried at sea.

NAS Jax, up the river, a last look at NAS Mayport, and out to sea.

RIP Mike, those you’ve trained have the watch.


Comments

RIP Mike… — 17 Comments

  1. It’s so great to see how you Americans treat your former members of your Military, at least in this instance. As for me, and thousands of others here in the Australian Defence Force, it’s literally, ‘Return ALL your service issued gear, uniforms, insignia, ..everything, so it can be burnt, as nothing that has touched skin is allowed to be kept or saved. Further, as a former Australian Defence Force member, it is FORBIDDEN to wear any Australian Military insignia, badges of rank, whether earned or not. To do so is a Federal offense, with heavy penalties. Oh, and as for me serving 21 years in the RAAF, and two years in the Reserve, my certificate of discharge was pretty much one torn off from the toilet roll of discharges, then handed to me over the admin. counter by a junior Corporal pen-pusher, she said, ‘Print and sign your name at the bottom, I’ll counter-sign it and then you’re free to go’. Nothing else, not even ‘thanks’. Charming…

    • Yikes. Definitely shows you are a subject and not a citizen. Dang.

      And thank you for your service. Australians have been in some of the most messed up military campaigns since they started providing military, and too few people remember their service and sacrifice.

      Heck, for a while, y’all were the only functional forces in the South Pacific during WWII and England wanted your troops over with her, not protecting y’all.

      What you endured is the way you treat a farm animal, not a soldier. For shame on your country. But, again, thanks for your service.

      Not being able to keep your uniforms or insignia. Geez, some people’s kids…

  2. Fair winds and following seas Senior, our country and Navy appreciate your service! And for those who remain on watch, remember Romans 8:28 And we know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them.

  3. All- Thanks for the comments. A227- Having worked with y’all multiple times, you damn well deserve better than that. Thank you for your service to Australia!

    Posted from my iPhone.

    • Thanks for your comments, at least you all ‘know’. I won’t blather on about it, except to say that we have a saying in our Defence Forces, quite probably goes way back to WW1, not sure though. It’s “If you can’t take the joke, you shouldn’t have joined”, that’s not the seniors saying that, it’s more often than not our peers, as a back-handed way of saying ‘Yeah, we’re all in the same boat’. Anyway, I’ll have another beer if you’re going that way. Cheers!.

  4. Hey Old NFO;

    The service is what separates us from many countries..in a lot of countries, being in the military is almost an embarrassment, my apologies to the Aussie’s. I didn’t know that they did that. I do know that the British vets wear their metals and regimental pins. In some countries being in the military or being a veteran is an honored status. I recall the early 70’s and late 70’s that being a veteran was frowned upon. It took President Reagan to make a big deal about the Military and in retrospect force a cultural shift on how veterans are treated.

    • I got to visit the Australian Military History Museum in Canberra in 1989. I had no idea (OK, I was a teenager, but I thought I knew my military history). I was very, very impressed by what Australians (and New Zealanders) have done over the years. And still – East Timor, other places.

      • TXRed,
        As both my sons live in Canberra, with one still serving as a Warrant Officer in the RAAF, (their Mother and I are ever bloody proud of them!). I swing by the Museum frequently, usually with my 10 year old Grandson in tow, at his request- I think he’s there for the ice cream. A lot has changed since 1989, even this crabby old bastard is impressed!. I particularly like the Vietnam era presentation. The viewer enters a diorama area, with a real Huey, skids in the tall grass, all quiet and still, crew and soldiers on board, subdued lighting. Then the timed audio/physical part kicks in, most everyone jumps, even a couple of screams, but you can’t hear it above the SOUND, just see it, scares the shit out of the half interested. Heavy rotor down-wash (watch your hair Ladies), and genuine A/G/A mission radio txms/chatter of the time blowing through your ears, The reactions of the unsuspecting is bloody funny!. Y’all are most welcome to come and check it out, there’s lots to see and experience, there is no entry fee, but donations are not frowned upon.

        • I was not too clear about our Sons. Both have been members of the RAAF, similar job as me, E/W,but very different – more modern gear/times. The younger Brother is still in and the older one is back in civvy street after doing his 20 years. He now manages a comic book shop in Canberra, and to say he’s as ‘happy as a pig in shit’ would be a large understatement!.

    • We can wear our own earned medals whenever we like, it’s a personal decision, but we generally only wear them on occasions like ANZAC Day, 25 April – the most significant day of the Australian Military calendar, the day ALL former and current serving members are publicly acknowledged by the people of Australia. Further,it’s also a personal choice if one wants to wear a unit or regimental pin on the lapel of civilian attire, a not unusual sight, particularly with the older generations of Vets, whenever I see that, I tend to catch the eye of the wearer, and give a nod of respect, lets them know that at least I know. Ahhh, it’s all good fun if you don’t weaken. Where’s that bloody beer!.

  5. All- Thanks for the comments. A227- When I went through the museum, I was looking for a gun to use… sigh… Being an airdale, I liked the museum at HMAS Albatross too! 🙂

    Posted from my iPhone.

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